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BETH STEINBERG
Vice President Of Human Resources
SunRun
• Professionals working to establish a career in the solar industry can look for job openings on SunRun's jobs board at http://www.sunrunhome.com/about-sunrun/careers.
• SunRun Partners with the top regional solar installation market players around the country in order to support local green job growth.
• SunRun's San Francisco Bay Area location provides a great network of green organizations and meetups where employees can connect with other renewable energy professionals, such as Women's Environmental Network, Net Zero, and Young Professionals in Energy.
San Francisco-based SunRun has amassed a number of awards lauding their innovative business model. The company owns and installs solar systems on homeowner's roofs. This way, homeowners can switch to solar for as little as $0 and just pay a low monthly rate for power. The model makes solar increasingly affordable for homeowners, particular median income communities that until recently had been largely priced out of the solar market. The result has been a massive growth phase for the company, up by 200 percent in 2010 and continuing to grow. The company has also contributed to the solar community in the way of policy and research, writing a report on solar permitting streamlining opportunities and partnering with the Department of Energy to identify ways to bring the installation costs of solar down by $2,500 per install. These streamlining measures bring the possibility of billions of additional dollars to state economies. "We're trying to lead from the front through policy and technology, said Vice President of Human Resources Beth Steinberg, "A lot of competitors are popping up, but we've been able to attract great employees because of our credibility in the solar community."

Beth indicated that interest from professionals looking to join SunRun's team has been outstanding, with applicants that aren't offered positions still referring other contacts in their network for interviews with the company. "People have the desire to create something great, and they see that they can do that with us," Steinberg said. Unlike the majority of solar companies, SunRun has grown to the point that a number of the job openings don't require a core competency in solar, with many employees having backgrounds in software engineering. Companies like SunRun are exemplary of the growing green job market in the San Francisco Bay Area.
SANDY PICKARD
Business Manager
Solar Energy International
• Take classes at Solar Energy International. Workshops are offered in solar, thermal, green building, and even hydro technologies. Classes are offered in twelve locations around the US.
• Roofers can improve their skills by taking classes in solar energy installation.
• Solar energy installation and commercial size energy efficiency projects are the hottest areas of green technology.
Solar Energy International has been providing education in solar and other renewable energy technologies for 20 years. They have become one of the premiere institutions for accredited renewable energy workshops and offer classes in a number of locations.

Business manager Sandy Pickard highlighted the important work this non-profit does through their educational mission. Solar Energy International has expanded to include workshops in solar electric, solar thermal, micro-hydro, and wind energy. Classes are also offered online.
TOM RAWLS
VP Sales And Marketing
Native Energy
• Look at social responsibility positions in large companies. Many companies are concerned about our energy future and their public image. Corporate responsibility positions will continue to be an area of continued job growth.
• Ceres (ceres.org) is a good place to look for companies interested in sustainability. BSR (The Business of a Better World) is an extensive network of sustainable companies and a good resource for job seekers.
• Check out schools with green and sustainability programs. The University of Vermont, Middlebury College, and St. Michael's College have excellent environmental programs.
Native Energy is a developer and seller of carbon credits. Carbon credits allow for the funding of renewable energy projects and reduce the amount of energy required from fossil fuels. When a company buys carbon offsets they are funding a project such as a wind farm or a methane digester and thus offsetting the effect of their own pollution. In the last 10 years, Native Energy clients have helped build a remarkable 48 projects including wind, biogas, and solar.
GREG HRIBAR
Program Manager
Sacramento Municipal Utility District
• SMUD's strategic partners offering networking opportunities include SARTA (Sacramento Area Regional Technology Alliance), the Sacramento Metro Chamber of Commerce, and Sacramento Area Commerce and Trade Organization (Sacto), TechCoire. Visit their websites for more information on upcoming events.
• SMUD works closely with the University of California, Davis Energy Efficiency Center and Sacramento State. Academic institutions like UC Davis often can suggest job leads and networking channels through community partners like SMUD.
• SMUD offers engineering internships through partnerships with local universities and community colleges.
Although Sacramento often takes a backseat to the other large California economies, when it comes to energy, Sacramento is on track to build a vibrant green economy. As the country's sixth largest municipal utility, SMUD (Sacramento Municipal Utility District) is one of the key players driving green economic growth in the area.

Projects that will spur job growth include SMUD's 128 megawatt Solano Wind Farm project-in-development, two separate solar farm projects, a 120 megawatt geothermal project to be completed between 2012 and 2013, a feed-in tariff program that will produce 100 megawatts of energy, and a pilot program to integrate solar arrays into two locations along Highway 50, near SMUD Headquarters in Sacramento and an interchange in the City of Rancho Cordova.

SMUD's Program Manager, Greg Hribar, says one of the benefits of being a public utility is that the customers are like shareholders: "We're not just here to make business partners. We're here to improve the community. Some SMUD projects don't always benefit the customer directly, but they do benefit the community. We're trying to be a leader." Greg says that a large contingency of SMUD employees will retire in the coming years, and the need to fill those jobs will provide additional economic stimulus.

He also points to the success of local start-ups like Folsom-based SynapSense Corporation as an indicator of Sacramento's promise as a green economy. "We prefer to utilize proven technology," Greg says, "but there have been a few cases where we partnered with a small company." In this case, SynapSense beta-tested its data-center technology at SMUD offices and was able to successfully bring the product to market. SMUD holds a series of events and seminars throughout the year, and is an excellent resource for emerging green professionals seeking employment in the Sacramento area.
ALEX KELTER
Immediate Past President
Environmental Council Of Sacramento
• Network at the Sacramento Sustainability Forum's Monthly meet-up.
• Local professional organizations such as the Sacramento chapter of the American Institute of Architects offer potential job leads.
• The University of California, Davis Center for Regional Change has a great environmental planning program.
In his work with the 40-year-old Environmental Council of Sacramento, Alex works with local business and government to propose policies around land and water use that protect the local habitat. One of the big grinds in the Sacramento area, according to Alex, centers around the development of agricultural land. Future environmental jobs will develop as organizations such as the one Alex works with seek to prevent development of certain areas by asking for government consideration to designate these as local wildlands.

"California is rich with environmental consulting firms because of California's strict environmental rules," says Alex. The resulting need for engineers, biologists, hydrologists, and planners will continue to bring green job growth to Sacramento.
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