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ALAN FRASZ
Vice President And Principal Owner
Dovetail Solar And Wind
• Get training! In a tough job market, those that have training in solar energy installation will get the jobs. On the job training is becoming much less common that it used to be in the solar installation industry.
• Ohio is a great place to get training in solar technologies. Community colleges across the state are offering training for solar technicians and solar installers. The University of Toledo, with its Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, is one of the top schools.
• The price of electricity generated from solar power is dropping very quickly. Look to price drops in solar power to be a factor driving growth.
Ohio has more government and private support for the solar industry than anywhere else in the Midwest, and Dovetail Solar and Wind has been one of its pioneering solar energy businesses. The company specializes in solar and wind electric systems, building integrated photovoltaic arrays, and solar thermal hot water systems.

Alan Frasz is Vice President and a principal owner of Dovetail Solar and Wind. Despite recent cutbacks by the Ohio state government in renewable energy investment, Alan's company is expanding at a quick pace, including plans to hire 10 to 15 more employees in the coming year. Alan has seen a 40 percent drop in the price of solar technologies in the last year, as prices continue to become more competitive with petrochemical generated energy. Although it has not expanded as quickly as he would hope, Alan expects thin film solar to be the future of solar.
SANDY PICKARD
Business Manager
Solar Energy International
• Take classes at Solar Energy International. Workshops are offered in solar, thermal, green building, and even hydro technologies. Classes are offered in twelve locations around the US.
• Roofers can improve their skills by taking classes in solar energy installation.
• Solar energy installation and commercial size energy efficiency projects are the hottest areas of green technology.
Solar Energy International has been providing education in solar and other renewable energy technologies for 20 years. They have become one of the premiere institutions for accredited renewable energy workshops and offer classes in a number of locations.

Business manager Sandy Pickard highlighted the important work this non-profit does through their educational mission. Solar Energy International has expanded to include workshops in solar electric, solar thermal, micro-hydro, and wind energy. Classes are also offered online.
TOM RAWLS
VP Sales And Marketing
Native Energy
• Look at social responsibility positions in large companies. Many companies are concerned about our energy future and their public image. Corporate responsibility positions will continue to be an area of continued job growth.
• Ceres (ceres.org) is a good place to look for companies interested in sustainability. BSR (The Business of a Better World) is an extensive network of sustainable companies and a good resource for job seekers.
• Check out schools with green and sustainability programs. The University of Vermont, Middlebury College, and St. Michael's College have excellent environmental programs.
Native Energy is a developer and seller of carbon credits. Carbon credits allow for the funding of renewable energy projects and reduce the amount of energy required from fossil fuels. When a company buys carbon offsets they are funding a project such as a wind farm or a methane digester and thus offsetting the effect of their own pollution. In the last 10 years, Native Energy clients have helped build a remarkable 48 projects including wind, biogas, and solar.
ALAN FRASZ
Vice President And Principal Owner
Dovetail Solar And Wind
• Get training! In a tough job market, those that have training in solar energy installation will get the jobs. On the job training is becoming much less common that it used to be in the solar installation industry.
• Ohio is a great place to get training in solar technologies. Community colleges across the state are offering training for solar technicians and solar installers. The University of Toledo, with its Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, is one of the top schools.
• The price of electricity generated from solar power is dropping very quickly. Look to price drops in solar power to be a factor driving growth.
Ohio has more government and private support for the solar industry than anywhere else in the Midwest, and Dovetail Solar and Wind has been one of its pioneering solar energy businesses. The company specializes in solar and wind electric systems, building integrated photovoltaic arrays, and solar thermal hot water systems.

Alan Frasz is Vice President and a principal owner of Dovetail Solar and Wind. Despite recent cutbacks by the Ohio state government in renewable energy investment, Alan's company is expanding at a quick pace, including plans to hire 10 to 15 more employees in the coming year. Alan has seen a 40 percent drop in the price of solar technologies in the last year, as prices continue to become more competitive with petrochemical generated energy. Although it has not expanded as quickly as he would hope, Alan expects thin film solar to be the future of solar.
JULIAN BOGGS
Program Associate
Environmental Ohio
• Since 2001, The University of Toledo has been home to a clean and alternative energy incubator that has become known for advancing solar technology. University of Toledo is a great place to study solar tech.
• Oberlin College is a great school for students that want to be trained in environmental activism and community organizing.
• Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman has worked to bring electric vehicle manufacturing jobs to Ohio. Look to electric vehicle manufacturing as a growth industry in Ohio.
Environment Ohio is a key member of the Ohio green community, with success in recent years bringing advances to the green economy, such as their work on passage of the 2008 Ohio renewable energy standard. This policy dictates that 12.5 percent of the state's electricity must come from clean sources of electricity like wind and solar by 2025. In addition, Ohio will reduce cumulative energy consumption by 22 percent.

Julian Boggs is a Program Associate at Environment Ohio, where he and other dedicated environmentalists work to protect Ohio's air, water, and open spaces. As part of their mission, Environment Ohio strives to build support for renewable energy solutions. Julian says Ohio's strong public support of clean energy standards will require green energy training for the workforce.

The state is already seeing the first benefits of green investment with CODA, a California based electric car battery manufacturer, announcing plans to build an automotive-grade lithium-ion battery systems plant in Ohio. With the leadership of local and national politicians, an experienced heavy manufacturing base, and a strong need to create new jobs, Ohio is a good place to look for future growth in the green business sector.
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